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Sinew of America

A Celebration of Tall Tales

Sinew of America( )
Editor: Japikse, Carl
Contribution by: Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
Irving, Washington
Frost, Robert
Morgan, Neville
O'Reilly, Edward
Holmes, Oliver Wendell
Whitman, Walt
Twain, Mark
Lindsay, Vachel
Service, Robert
Bierce, Ambrose
ISBN:978-0-89804-681-6
Publication Date:Jan 2001
Publisher:Ariel Press
Imprint:Kudzu House
Book Format:Paperback
List Price:USD $11.99
Book Details
Pages:124
Detailed Subjects: Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):5.25 x 8.25 x 0.3 Inches
Author Biography
(Editor)
During his lifetime, Longfellow enjoyed a popularity that few poets have ever known. This has made a purely literary assessment of his achievement difficult, since his verse has had an effect on so many levels of American culture and society. Certainly, some of his most popular poems are, when considered merely as artistic compositions, found wanting in serious ways: the confused imagery and sentimentality of "A Psalm of Life" (1839), the excessive didacticism of "Excelsior" (1841), the sentimentality of "The Village Blacksmith" (1839). Yet, when judged in terms of popular culture, these works are probably no worse and, in some respects, much better than their counterparts in our time.

Longfellow was very successful in responding to the need felt by Americans of his time for a literature of their own, a retelling in verse of the stories and legends of these United States, especially New England. His three most popular narrative poems are thoroughly rooted in American soil. "Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie" (1847), an American idyll; "The Song of Hiawatha" (1855), the first genuinely native epic in American poetry; and "The Courtship of Miles Standish" (1858), a Puritan romance of Longfellow's own ancestors, John Alden and Priscilla Mullens. "Paul Revere's Ride," the best known of the "Tales of a Wayside Inn"(1863), is also intensely national. Then, there is a handful of intensely personal, melancholy poems that deal in very successful ways with those themes not commonly thought of as Longfellow's: sorrow, death, frustration, the pathetic drift of humanity's existence. Chief among these are "My Lost Youth" (1855), "Mezzo Cammin" (1842), "The Ropewalk" (1854), "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" (1852), and, most remarkable in its artistic success, "The Cross of Snow," a heartfelt sonnet so personal in its expression of the poet's grief for his dead wife that it remained unpublished until after Longfellow's death. A professor of modern literature at Harvard C



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