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Schopenhauer

Prize Essay on the Freedom of the Will

Schopenhauer( )
Author: Schopenhauer, Arthur
Translator: Payne, Eric F. J.
Contribution by: Ameriks, Karl
Clarke, Desmond M.
Editor: Zöller, Günter
Series title:Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy Ser.
ISBN:978-0-521-57141-8
Publication Date:Apr 1999
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
Book Format:Hardback
List Price:AUD $129.95
Book Description:

New translation of Schopenhauer's brilliant and elegant essay on free will and determinism.

Book Details
Pages:144
Detailed Subjects: Philosophy / Free Will & Determinism
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):15.6 x 23.6 x 1.5 cm
Book Weight:0.36 Kilograms
Author Biography
Schopenhauer, Arthur (Author)
Arthur Schopenhauer traveled in childhood throughout Europe and lived for a time in Goethe's Weimar, where his mother had established a salon that attracted many of Europe's leading intellectuals. As a young man, Schopenhauer studied at the University of Gottingen and in Berlin, where he attended the lectures of Fichte and Schleiermacher.

Schopenhauer's first work was The Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason (1813), followed by a treatise on the physiology of perception, On Vision and Colors (1816). When Schopenhauer wrote his principal work, The World as Will and Idea (1819), he was confident that it was a work of great importance that would soon win him fame, but in this he was badly disappointed. In 1819 he arranged to hold a series of philosophical lectures at the same time as those of the newly arrived professor Hegel, whom Schopenhauer despised (calling him, among other creative epithets, an "intellectual Caliban"). This move resulted only in further humiliation for Schopenhauer, since no one showed up to hear him.

Schopenhauer continued to be frustrated in repeated attempts to achieve recognition. In 1839 and 1840 he submitted essays on freedom of the will and the foundation of morality to competitions sponsored by the Royal Danish Academy but he won no prize, even when his essay was the only entry in the competition. In 1844 he published a second volume of The World as Will and Idea, containing developments and commentaries on the first. Around 1850, toward the end of his life, Schopenhauer's philosophy began to receive belated recognition, and he died in the confidence that his long-awaited and deserved fame had finally come.

Schopenhauer's philosophy exercised considerable influence in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, not only among academic philosophers but even more among artists and literati. This may be in part because, unlike his German idealist contemporaries, Schopenhauer is a lucid and



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