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Emile

Or Treatise on Education

Emile( )
Author: Rousseau, Jean-Jacques
Translator: Payne, William H.
Series title:Great Books in Philosophy
ISBN:978-1-59102-111-7
Publication Date:Jun 2013
Publisher:Prometheus Books, Publishers
Book Format:Paperback
List Price:AUD $26.99
Book Description:

In his pioneering treatise on education the great French philosopher presented concepts that had a significant influence on the development of pedagogy, and yet many of his ideas still sound radical today. Written in reaction to the stultifying system of rote learning and memorization prevalent throughout Europe in Rousseau's time, Émile is a utopian vision of child-centered education, full of the sentiments of Romanticism, which Rousseau himself inspired. Imagining...
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Book Details
Pages:315
Detailed Subjects: Education / History
Education / Philosophy, Theory & Social Aspects
Physical Dimensions (W X L X H):13.7 x 21 x 2.1 cm
Book Weight:0.408 Kilograms
Author Biography
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (Author)
Jean Jacques Rousseau was a Swiss philosopher and political theorist who lived much of his life in France. Many reference books describe him as French, but he generally added "Citizen of Geneva" whenever he signed his name. He presented his theory of education in Emile (1762), a novel, the first book to link the educational process to a scientific understanding of children; Rousseau is thus regarded as the precursor, if not the founder, of child psychology. "The greatest good is not authority, but liberty," he wrote, and in The Social Contract (1762) Rousseau moved from a study of the individual to an analysis of the relationship of the individual to the state: "The art of politics consists of making each citizen extremely dependent upon the polis in order to free him from dependence upon other citizens." This doctrine of sovereignty, the absolute supremacy of the state over its members, has led many to accuse Rousseau of opening the doors to despotism, collectivism, and totalitarianism. Others say that this is the opposite of Rousseau's intent, that the surrender of rights is only apparent, and that in the end individuals retain the rights that they appear to have given up. In effect, these Rousseau supporters say, the social contract is designed to secure or to restore to individuals in the state of civilization the equivalent of the rights they enjoyed in the state of nature. Rousseau was a passionate man who lived in passionate times, and he still stirs passion in those who write about him today.

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